Perpetual Calendar

orchid catalaya032

I just added my new perpetual calendar to my Etsy store. The calendars are 11 inches high by 4 1/4 inches wide, a cover and 12 pages bound by owires.  The perpetual calendars are good every year and can be used over and over again.

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Each page (each month) has a picture of a hand-painted (watercolor) orchid.

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I will be selling these on my Etsy store to help feed rescued animals. A portion of the profits will be donated to one of the several animal rescues that I work with. These are great for keeping track of birthdays and anniversaries and they make excellent gifts.

T’was The Night Before Christmas

My Ice

T’was the night before Christmas

And all through the glades

The sounds of the season

Are heard as preparations are made.

 

 

The herd is all tacked with holly and bells

And the packages are loaded on the sleigh.

Santa is seated and ready to go and

Soon they’ll be on their way.

 

Delivering presents and Christmas cheer,

Vanessa and Bo will be leading the team.

Swani and Shadow are right behind

Followed by Ice and Dalton, all living a dream.

 

All helping Santa this Christmas eve night.

So listen real close  for whinnies and bells

Then look to the sky for the sleigh and my herd

And listen for Santa as they go by and he yells….

 

Merry Christmas to all and to all a good year.

 

barefoot horse

A Barefoot Horse – A Lifestyle Part 4

 

Jamie and Chance on the trail

A Barefoot Horse On The Trail

As mentioned in the previous 3 posts, “The barefoot horse” is not just a description of a horse without shoes nor is it just a description of the hoof condition of a horse. Rather, it is a description of a lifestyle of a horse. The lifestyle of a barefoot horse includes:

  • A free choice, forage based diet which is low in sugar, low in starch, and balanced to have the correct amount and ratios of vitamins and minerals for the type of hay being fed.
  • Living conditions and environment which allow for and encourage movement over several different types of terrain including grass, gravel and rock.
  • Daily exercise that includes walking, trotting and galloping. Horses in open range situations will travel 15 or more miles a day.
  • A proper barefoot trim every 4 to 6 weeks. Some horses can go longer if the environment promotes some self-trimming.

This post covers the trim and  is the last post in this series that will define ideal conditions listed above that are important for the development and maintenance of a healthy barefoot horse and give you some reasonable and practical options.

working on a front hoof

A proper barefoot trim every 4 to 6 weeks….some horses can go longer if the environment promotes some self-trimming (is very rocky or has a lot of gravel). It is important to know that a pasture trim and a barefoot trim are not the same. A pasture trim is often used during off season (when you cannot ride) to allow the hoof to rest from being shod. A barefoot trim uses the natural hoof as a model and is designed to help the hoof grow into and function as a healthy natural foot. A general description is a balanced trim with “low heel, short toe, slight arch at the quarters, and a mustang roll that eliminates peripheral loading (weight on the outer wall of the hoof)” The natural hoof bears the majority of the weight on the inner wall, frog, bars, and peripheral area of the sole (and related inner structures). The natural hoof model is the goal and the trim sets the hoof up to allow for proper growth resulting from pressure and release (stimulus caused by impact, flexion, distortion). You cannot carve a good foot, you have to grow one and that takes a combination of proper diet, environment, exercise, trim and time (about a year). I try to offer reasonable and practical options but the only option here might be that you can extend the number of weeks between trims if the horse gets a proper barefoot trim and enough movement and exercise over terrain that promotes some self-trimming. Note that proper self-trimming can only be accomplished if the horse’s environment includes some gravel and rock. Extending the time between trims without the proper environment can be detrimental and inhibit hoof growth or promote incorrect growth.

Written by Susan Boyd    Edited by Zachary Franklin, DVM

Thank you to my friend Jamie McNeil for photos of her barefoot horses

Horses on open range

The Barefoot Horse – A Lifestyle Part 3

 

As mentioned in posts 1 and 2, “The Barefoot Horse” is not just a description of a horse without shoes, nor is it just a description of the hoof condition of a horse. Rather, it is a description of a lifestyle of a horse. The lifestyle of a barefoot horse includes:

  • A free choice, forage based diet which is low in sugar, low in starch, and balanced to have the correct amount and ratios of vitamins and minerals for type of hay being fed.
  • Living conditions and environment which allow for and encourage movement over several different types of terrain including grass, gravel, and rock.
  • Daily exercise that includes waling, trotting and galloping. Horses in open range situations will travel 15 miles or more a day.
  • A proper barefoot trim every 4 to 6 weeks. Some horses can go longer if the environment promotes some self trimming.

This is the third in a series of articles that will define ideal conditions listed above that are important for the development and maintenance of a healthy barefoot horse and give you some reasonable and practical options. Continue reading

The Barefoot Horse – a Lifestyle part 2

DIGITAL CAMERAThe Barefoot Horse – a Lifestyle

Written by Susan Boyd and edited by Zachary Franklin, DVM

This is the second post in a series of four about the lifestyle of the barefoot horse. “The barefoot horse” is not merely a description of a horse without shoes nor is it a description of the hoof condition of a horse. Rather, it is the description of a lifestyle of a horse that includes:
A free choice, forage based diet which is low in sugar, low in starch, and balanced to contain the proper amounts and ratios of vitamins and minerals for type of forage being fed.
Living conditions and an environment which allow for and encourage movement over several different types of terrain including grass, gravel, and rock.
Daily exercise that includes walking, trotting and galloping. Horses living on the open range will travel 15 or more miles a day.
A proper barefoot trim every 4 to 6 weeks. Some horses can go longer if the environment promotes some self-trimming Continue reading

Pete Ramey looking at radiographs and discussing nutrition

Pete Ramey – equine hoof care and nutrition

 Pete Ramey discusses equine hoof care and nutrition

Equine hoof care and nutrition were important subjects in the hoof rehabilitation workshop conducted by Pete Ramey  at Woodrose Ranch and Equestrian Center last Saturday. He started the workshop with an hour plus discussion on equine hoof care and nutrition – emphasis on nutrition. There are many things that go into building, maintaining, or rehabilitating a horses foot. The primary ingredient is nutrition. Without good nutrition, the rest of it does not matter. You cannot trim your way back to a healthy foot he told us. Continue reading

Pete Ramey Hoof Rehabilitation Workshop

Pete RameyPete Ramey Hoof Rehabilitation Workshop January 23, 2016

This was the first Hoof Rehabilitation Workshop in South Florida presented by Pete Ramey. It was cold for South Florida and windy but 15 participants consisting of farriers, hoof trimmers, horse owners and a veterinarian gathered at Woodrose Ranch and Equestrian Center to watch, listen, and learn. Continue reading